Don’t Act Like This Guy While Lane Splitting

dont-act-like-this-guy-while-lane-splitting

I’m amazed to see bikers in California believing lane splitting is a right and that every car should do everything possible to get out of their way. Well, guess what – you’re not the ambulance, not a police officer and definitely not a fire truck in a mission, so stop pretending you own the street, and everybody should get out of the way.

Yeah, so we got this rider here lane splitting ‘like a baus’ when suddenly he discovers he can’t go further as two cars were stopped too close to each other and the gap was too small in between them for the guy to filter.

In such situation, you either cautiously move in between other lanes to continue your filtering or patiently wait until the traffic moves forward and hopefully the cars will reposition in the center of their lanes.

Not in this case, though. The guy starts revving his engine hard and flips the two drivers off, hoping they understand he is a much important person than they are and needs to go past as soon as possible, despite the fact that a semi truck was blocking the gap ahead as well.

Eventually, the traffic moves on, and he is able to pass through, not before giving both drivers the stare and revving his engine once more. Then he sees the person in the BMW X5 is filming him and decides to show him the disgraceful hand sign again and even stopped next to him at the next red light to lecture him.

He claimed it’s illegal to impede his path and starts threatening the man. What a dumb potato… First of all, lane splitting is a privilege, not a right, and so is operating any other motorized vehicles on public rods.

Second, the old CHP (California Highway Patrol) lane splitting guide was saying that “Intentionally blocking or impeding a motorcyclist in a way that could cause harm to the rider is illegal .” Which is totally not the case here. The two drivers probably had no idea the guy was trying to pass and probably didn’t have enough space in front to move back on the center of the lane to let him go.

Don’t forget that people usually tend to remember the bad things other do instead of their good deeds, and an incident like this has more impact on the motorcycle community than, say, biker charity events.

Ride smoothly, be respectful to other road users and don’t make a scene for minor mistakes other do.

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